Isabell Werth & Weihegold Dominate Neumünster World Cup Grand Prix in Bid for Final Start in Pursuit of 3rd Straight Championship Title

Isabell Werth on Weihegold OLD. File photo. © Ken Braddick/dressage-news.com

NEUMÜNSTER, Germany, Feb. 16, 2019–Isabell Werth and Weihegold had a dominating win in the World Cup Grand Prix Saturday as the German pair seek a start to defend the championship title won for the past two years.

Isabell and the 14-year-old Oldenburg mare, the world’s No. 1 combination, scored 82.565 per cent for the fifth straight win since August last year.

Isabell and the horse on which she won the annual championship in 2017 and 2018 needs only to complete the freestyle Sunday as the second competition required to earn a start at the final in Gothenburg, Sweden in April.

Helen Langehanenberg on Damsey FRH placed second on 76.413 per cent in the ninth of 10 qualifiers in the World Cup Western European League.

Ireland’s Judy Reynolds on Vancouver K were third on 75.109 per cent.

Results:

CDI-W Grand Prix

Judges-E: Christof Umbach H: Hans-Christian Matthiesen C: Dr. Evi Eisenhardt M: Katrina Wüst B: Marietta Almasy

Pl. no Horse Nat. Rider E H C M B Total
1. 374 Weihegold OLD
M Old R 2005 Don Schufro x Sandro Hit B: Bastian,Inge O: Arns-Krogmann,Christine
GER
Isabell Werth
RFV Graf von Schmettow Eversael
4.050 82.174%
378
(1)
83.152%
382.5
(1)
82.609%
380
(1)
83.370%
383.5
(1)
81.522%
375
(1)
82.565%
1899.00
2. 167 Damsey FRH
S Hann B 2002 Dressage Royal x Ritual B: Hengsthaltung Dorit u.Hermann Kothe O: Leatherdale,Louise,Meyer,Susanne
GER
Helen Langehanenberg
RV St.Georg Münster e.V.
3.000 76.630%
352.5
(2)
75.978%
349.5
(2)
76.522%
352
(3)
74.891%
344.5
(3)
78.043%
359
(2)
76.413%
1757.50
3. 619 Vancouver K
G KWPN B 2002 Jazz x Ferro B: G.M. Korver (NED) O: Joe & Kathleen Reynolds
IRL
Judy Reynolds
IRL
1.950 74.022%
340.5
(5)
74.130%
341
(4)
75.217%
346
(4)
74.674%
343.5
(4)
77.500%
356.5
(3)
75.109%
1727.50
4. 338 Sammy Davis jr.
S Bay R 2006 San Remo x Wenckstern B: Volkert,Hans O: Herbert,Matthias
GER
Dorothee Schneider
Frankf.Turnierst.Schw.Gelb e.V.
1.500 74.783%
344
(4)
74.565%
343
(3)
76.630%
352.5
(2)
75.543%
347.5
(2)
73.804%
339.5
(5)
75.065%
1726.50
5. 165 Daily mirror 9
G Westf R 2004 Damon Hill x Florestan I B: ZG Kellermann u. Platte, O: Keller,Flora
GER
Benjamin Werndl
RFV Aubenhausen e.V.
1.350 76.087%
350
(3)
73.696%
339
(5)
74.674%
343.5
(5)
73.261%
337
(6)
76.522%
352
(4)
74.848%
1721.50
6. 534 Aqiedo
S KWPN DB 2005 Undigo x Metall B: van Baalen-Roebers O: A. van Manen & A. Cornelissen
NED
Adelinde Cornelissen
NED
1.200 70.217%
323
(11)
72.826%
335
(6)
74.130%
341
(6)
74.348%
342
(5)
73.696%
339
(6)
73.043%
1680.00
7. 383 San Royal 3
G Old Schwb 2007 San Remo x Grand Royal B: Rosemann,Martina O: Stall Keller GmbH&Co.KG,
GER
Kathleen Keller
HH-Schleppjagdverein e.V.
1.050 71.957%
331
(6)
72.609%
334
(7)
71.848%
330.5
(7)
73.043%
336
(7)
72.283%
332.5
(7)
72.348%
1664.00
8. 623 Zuidenwind 1187
S KWPN B 2004 OO-Seven x Jazz B: H. van Helvoirt (NED) O: Gränsbo Stuteri & VDL Stud
SWE
Rose Mathisen
SWE
900 70.978%
326.5
(9)
71.196%
327.5
(8)
70.000%
322
(11)
72.391%
333
(9)
71.522%
329
(8)
71.217%
1638.00
8. 210 Fabregaz
G Bay Schwb 2007 Florestano x Ragazzo B: Hofbauer, Mariele u.Karl, O: Capellmann-Lütkemeier,Gina
GER
Fabienne Müller-Lütkemeier
RFV Paderborn e.V.
900 71.304%
328
(8)
70.978%
326.5
(9)
71.413%
328.5
(8)
72.609%
334
(8)
69.783%
321
(11)
71.217%
1638.00
total = €15.900
not placed
10. 558 Dambacu NL
G Hann B 2007 Danone II x Alantas xx B: Frauke Niemann.-Laue O: Gert Saborowski
FIN
Emma Kanerva
Elbdörfer u.Schenefelder RV e.V.
70.109%
322.5
(12)
69.457%
319.5
(11)
70.978%
326.5
(9)
71.413%
328.5
(10)
69.239%
318.5
(14)
70.239%
1615.50
11. 549 Catch Me
G KWPN DB 2007 Dreamcatcher x Goodtimes B: M. Evers (NED) O: M. Timmermans & Dhr. D. v. Kreij
NED
Margo Timmermans
NED
71.522%
329
(7)
68.370%
314.5
(13)
69.783%
321
(12)
70.870%
326
(11)
69.348%
319
(13)
69.978%
1609.50
12. 599 May-Day Graftebjerg
M DWB B 2003 Dream of Heidelberg x B: O: Arne Bjerg-Nielsen
DEN
Carina Cassøe Krüth
DEN
70.543%
324.5
(10)
69.783%
321
(10)
70.326%
323.5
(10)
68.370%
314.5
(13)
70.435%
324
(9)
69.891%
1607.50
13. 585 Hexagon’s Double Dutch
S KWPN F 2008 Johnson TN x Rubiquil B: van Lieren O: Stal Hexagon & L.F.L.v. Lieren
NED
Thamar Zweistra
NED
69.565%
320
(13)
66.522%
306
(14)
69.565%
320
(13)
68.696%
316
(12)
69.565%
320
(12)
68.783%
1582.00
14. 566 Elegance N
G KWPN B 2009 Jazz x Broere Obelisk B: F.C.Nienhuis O: Nars Gottmer, Matty Marissink Stabl
NED
Nars Gottmer
NED
66.522%
306
(15)
69.130%
318
(12)
67.826%
312
(14)
66.630%
306.5
(15)
70.217%
323
(10)
68.065%
1565.50
15. 606 Ramoneur 6
S Old DF 2002 Rohdiamant x Alabaster B: Bettin-Schulze-Schleppinghoff, B. O: Tanya Seymour
RSA
Tanya Seymour
RSA
65.652%
302
(16)
65.435%
301
(16)
66.630%
306.5
(15)
67.826%
312
(14)
66.304%
305
(15)
66.370%
1526.50
16. 598 Lertevangs Lavinia
M DWB B 2005 Celebration F. Damgaard x Linaro B: Peter Jensen Hansen O: Gretha Ferreira-Veldman
RSA
Gretha Ferreira
RSA
67.717%
311.5
(14)
66.522%
306
(14)
64.348%
296
(16)
66.087%
304
(16)
65.652%
302
(16)
66.065%
1519.50

 

 

Source: Dressage News

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Vanessa Way & NRM Andreas Win Feilding NZL Championship CDI3* Grand Prix Freestyle For Double Victory in Big Tour Debut

FEILDING, New Zealand, Feb 16, 2019–Vanessa Way  and NRM Andreas won the national championship CDI3* Grand Prix Freestyle Saturday to complete a double victory in the debut Big Tour competition of the all-New Zealand combination. Vanessa and the 11-year-old Hanoverian gelding were awarded 72.495 per cent for the win by just 0.01 per cent over ...

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West Coast Dressage Festival CDI/National Show Condensed to Two Days After Heavy Rain Causes Delay

Horses schooling Friday at Temecula, California World Cup and national show after downpours Thursday caused a day’s delay.

TEMECULA, California, Feb. 15, 2019–The West Coast Dressage Festival World Cup and national show has been condensed into two weekend days after downpours caused Friday’s competitions to be delayed.

More than 8 ins./20.3cm of rain over the show grounds Thursday caused the delay in starting the second show in this year’s West Coast series, an occurrence that event organizer Scott Hayes described as “a year’s worth of rain in one day.”

This is the second year of the WCDF circuit that Scott launched in 2018 with four CDIs aimed at offering in winter world international competitions including World Cup qualifiers aside from the Adequan Global Dressage Festival in Wellington, Florida–2,600 miles/4,200km away on the other side of the country. Six World Cup events have been scheduled at Temecula for 2019.

 

Source: Dressage News

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USA Launches Coaches Support Network to Expand Training, Support Across Nation–Willy Arts, Ali Brock, Ashley Holzer, Günter Seidel Sign On to Give Back

Feb. 14, 2019

By KENNETH J. BRADDICK

Some of America’s top riders and trainers, including three Olympians, have joined a Coaches Support Network newly created by the United States Equestrian Federation to expand training and support to overcome vast distances across the nation. The trainers described their involvement in the program unique in U.S. dressage as an “honor” to give back to the sport in which they have been successful.

The immediate goal is to work with the coaching staff of Technical Advisor and Chef d’Equipe Debbie McDonald, Development Coach Charlotte Bredahl, Youth Coach George Williams and Young Horse Coach Christine Traurig to make U.S. dressage programs more accessible, seek out new and developing talent, provide support at competitions, offer additional training opportunities to athletes and build camaraderie in the American dressage community.

Coaches in the pilot phase of the support network are:

Willy Arts, 59 years old, of DG Bar Ranch in Hanford, California, involved for many years in world class breeding and training programs, including the Royal Dutch Warmblood Association of North America and the Friesian Horse Association;

Ali Brock, 39, of Wellington, a member of the 2016 U.S. Olympic bronze medal team who has trained and competed on both sides of the Atlantic;

Ashley Holzer, 55, of Wellington, Florida, four-time Olympian and three-time World Games rider for her native Canada, who now competes for the United States, and

Günter Seidel, 58, of Cardiff, California,  who competed for the United States at three Olympics, winning three team bronze medals, and at three World Games winning team silver and team bronze.

“We are very excited to be bringing on a network of trainers and coaches that already exist in our own U.S. dressage community. Bringing in dressage coaches with similar goals to our program can only help us further reach out to and develop the pool of talent that we know exists among our athletes and horses.” –USA team coach Debbie McDonald

The program is being coordinated by Hallye Griffin, USEF managing director of dressage, and was conceived to engage with dressage riders spread over a country of about 330 milion people and twice the size of the European Union whose 28 nations include dressage powerhouses Germany, Great Britain, Netherlands, Sweden and Denmark each with their own coaching and support staffs.

Charlotte Bredahl, the development coach who is also working to return to her FEI4* judge status and has homes in both California and Florida, said the coaches added to the network will quickly work on the calendar to create clinics, focused mostly on young horses and emerging athletes though there are no hard and fast rules. She expects there will be overlapping commitments.

“The number one qualification for these coaches is to be committed,” she said, “as so many are also committed to to their own riding.

“Everybody is very enthusiastic. It’s really needed. We all know each other, we like each other, we respect each other very much. We all feel very privileged to be part of the group. We’re all incredibly passionate how we feel about the sport.

“We’re very proud of what’s been achieved and the sportsmanship among riders that has been amazing and we will do everything possible to keep it up.”

Scenes similar to this in Rotterdam of supporters are common wherever in the world Americans dressage riders compete. © 2018 Ken Braddick/dressage-news.com

Ali Brock, who rode Rosevelt on the American team that earned bronze at the 2016 Olympics, has been working with youth programs developed by U.S. Olympian Lendon Gray including the Dressage4Kids Winter Intensive Training Program in Wellington.

“It’s a real honor to do this,” she said. “I’m really looking forward to it.

“Going forward I think we’ll be calling on elite athletes to give back. That’s how it should be–there’s nothing like someone who has gone down the road, who has been successful and achieved something, helping others through the journey.

“I see things going in a really positive, thoughtful direction for growing the sport from the ground up.

“We need to keep growing and really improving, communicating. Let’s see what we can do as they turn us loose.”

Willy Arts, widely known for decades working with young horses, said, “I’m honored to be asked to be part of the program, and will do my best to fulfill tasks I’m asked to do. I think it’s a great idea to relieve the work load of the coaches a little bit, and get more people involved to develop and support the riders and owners and their horses.

“As we are very much involved in the young horse program that will make it easy for me to follow and see the development and horses available.

“I’m excited to see what the expansion of the team will add over the years to an already well developed program.”

Günter Seidel, German-born but a dedicated Californian pursuing his other passion, surfing, as well as equestrian, was on the United States teams that won bronze at the 1996, 2000 and 2004 Olympics as well as team silver at the 2002 World Equestrian Games and bronzee in 2006 in addition to riding at the 1998 world championships.

He is already working with a couple of Under-25 riders as well as continuing to compete himself.

“We’re giving back a little,” he said, “helping a great team in place right now.”

Ashley Holzer’s four Olympics include the only one in which Canada won a medal, in Seoul in 1988, as well as three World Games.

She competes three Grand Prix mounts and a Small Tour horse as well as working with both Americans and Canadians at her Wellington training center–a schedule that typically starts before sun up and goes until well after dark. Asked how she could fit the new program into her schedule, she replied: “They were very specific about saying it would not be at a time when I was super busy. They would work around my schedule. My daughter and my son are at school so there’s a chance I could get to different parts of the country because one is in California and one is in Boston.”

She added:

“As much as I am busy they were so mindful of the fact that I do coach some Canadians that I am myself riding I just thought if there is any way I can be helpful–if I do just one clinic and find one up and coming star who would not be noticed had I not taken the time to take one trip. It’s sort of your duty in a way, what you owe the sport a little bit. Yes, it’s one more thing on my plate, but I think it’s important that as a trainer and a rider and someone who has benefited so much from the sport to give back to someone who may be like myself 30 years ago–just needed a little leg up, a little help, needed a little ‘you can do this, let’s find a plan for the horse’.

“This is not taking on a student 24/7. I think it’s the right thing to do. I enjoy training horses very much and I do like seeing up and coming talent so I’m honored. It’s not often a new country calls you up and says, ‘hey, we’d like you to be part of our sport for the U.S. and to help find U.S. talent.’ So, I said, ‘yes’.”

 

 

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Source: Dressage News

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Isabell Werth Wellington Clinic–Lauren Sprieser/Guernsey Elvis, Yvonne Losos de Muñiz/Felicia, Benjamin Albright/Falstaff, Jacqueline Brooks/Westwood, Austin Webster/Abacrombie, Anne Marie Hosbond/Flashdance

Editor’s note: Ilse Schwarz is a trainer based in Wellington, Florida and a contributor to dressage-news.com. Along with about 1,500 others, she attended the recent clinic by Isabell Werth, currently world No. 1 with Weihegold OLD, No. 3 with Bella Rose and No. 4 with Emilio. Isabell has won 10 Olympic medals, more than any other equestrian.

 

Lauren Sprieser on Guernsey Elvis with Isabell Werth. © 2019 SusanJStickle.com

By ILSE SCHWARZ

Those waiting for intricate exercises, catchy phrases and cute mental imagery were going to be disappointed. Isabell is a trainer and rider who produces top horses time and time again. She doesn’t have a specific “type” of horse. She has had repeated and continued success with more different horses than one could imagine. There are no tricks. There are no magic buttons. She has a repeatable system. It is forwards, she demands flexion from inside leg to outside rein (never heard that before, have we?) and shoulder-in, shoulder-in and more shoulder-in. I am pretty sure that every single spectator realizes they do not do enough shoulder-in.

Sadly, due to the demands of my own equines, I missed the first horse and rider, the five-year-old by Feedback. I heard they were excellent to teach and watch.

Anne Marie Hosbond on Flashdance. © 2019 SusanJStickle.com

The rides all started in a similar way. Isabell hadn’t seen any of these combinations live. They were selected from video footage. So, the first few minutes were spent assessing the gaits and mechanics of the horses and then, without exception the rides moved to addressing suppleness and reaction to the leg.

I apologize in advance to the riders, I know that when you put yourself in the public eye, open for criticism, you are taking tremendous risk. I will try not to take any of her comments or directives out of context, but Isabell really doesn’t care who you are. She ONLY cares that you RIDE. Over-controlling reins, disruption of the gaits, sharp, unplanned turns are likely to to be followed by a significant increase in the volume of her voice and more demands. She wants every combination to get it. To succeed. To feel the difference. To challenge them and create change.

The first rider I saw was Lauren Sprieser on her own Guernsey Elvis. Lauren is well known for her entertaining and down to earth blogs. She says it like it is and is not shy about admitting when she meets challenges. She writes what we all experience in this world and I was excited to see her ride.

The session started with a quick analysis of the walk, the footfalls and the relaxation out to the bit. Lauren started her trot work and Isabell was immediately addressing suppleness, bending through the rib cage.

“Shoulder in, rib cage bend, inside leg, then flexion.”

Lauren was quick to achieve this so the next step was to add little transitions within the shoulder-in, but to keep cadence.

After each corner, there was a clear demand for inside flexion, inside leg, get the jaw/jowels supple and really bending through the ribcage. This became the theme throughout all the rides. Lauren did a great job. Her horse has extravagant front legs and it would be easy to just focus on their beauty. Obviously Isabell sees the whole horse and was quick to notice if the hind legs did less.

When he would start to run, Isabell is adding the “bbbbbbrrrrrr” calming noise (that classic sound we have learned from the Europeans, the one that sounds like you are blowing a raspberry. It works best when you can roll your “rRr’s”), and then loud “click” when she wants a more active hind leg.

She reminds us and Lauren again that the rhythm is always the same, you don’t sacrifice quality of gaits, with every adjustment you keep the cadence, keep flexion, keep rhythm and quiet hands.

In the half pass… flexion, flexion, flexion, keep the cadence and trot al little smaller at the beginning, then when the balance is established add swing and ground cover so you build and build.

It is important to start slowly, maintaining flexion. Start with the INSIDE leg and outside rein. The inside hind leg of the horse needs to come up and under to start the half pass, the shoulders lead and the hind legs follow, not the other way. She had all the riders ride their half passes in this way.

Once the horse has his balance and cadence in the half pass then you can add and add the swing and “CELEBRATE” the half pass.

She then let Elvis have a walk break and moved onto the walk pirouettes… which she confessed she doesn’t really enjoy showing in competition. She assumed most riders were the same. There was a bit of a chuckle from the 1,500-strong audience.

Essentially she wants to keep them uncomplicated and active. Don’t let them fall into the inside shoulder. If this happens imagine you pick up the inside shoulder. You can tap the inside shoulder with the whip if the inside leg isn’t enough.

The transition to canter also needs to be uncomplicated

This horse has a slightly stilted canter. It is no surprise that Isabell immediately wants to improve the jump and ground cover. The directive is simple: “keep the contact on the outside rein and make him longer on the outside of his body, give the inside rein so the inside leg has room to have a ‘long” jump’.

“Outside rein, inside leg, uphill, keep the cadence, keep him collected.” But she really means it.

Always back to the jump. Forwards to the outside rein from the outside leg and then flexion in the ribs from the inside leg

Then easy, sit and let him work

Then it was onto the pirouettes. Like the half pass, this is one of the movements that Isabell gets HUGE scores on. With every horse. No exceptions. I was eager to see how she addressed them.

“Go first on the circle and test how he collects. Test how much you have to ride for this and how little you can do. The rider CANNOT get busy. Again keep the outside rein, even keep the outside rein a little to the outside.

Lauren showed a good pirouette but the canter in and out were less in jump and quality than the jump during the pirouette. Isabell decides this needs to be a focus of the training.

Set up the pirouette and when in it and set up, give the inside rein and flex from the inside leg.

As you leave the pirouette she wants the rider to ride forward and create jump in the canter.

In the moment, she gets rather excited and you can sense that she WISHES she could speak German as she searches for the words in English. She wants her directions to flow more quickly so she then demonstrates with her body where she wants the positioning of the inside hind leg when the pirouette can start. That the inside leg is reaching under and forwards, not reaching sideways. This way the pirouette can start small and finish small.

The secret is not the pirouette, it is the preparation before. That you can collect the horse on your seat, that you can feel the jump under your seat. That you can control the jump all the time in any size of pirouette.

In the changes, Isabell clicks the rhythm she wants for the canter, so we can all hear how her brain is thinking. She wants more jump as long as he is uphill. Cover more ground, keep the jump big but keep it easy, uncomplicated. Don’t over-manage the canter and sacrifice the canter. The changes are good, but the jump in between is being sacrificed. This also becomes a continual theme over the evening. Isabell wants the horses to travel in an easy way between the changes. Not micro managed or stilted.

As Lauren leaves the arena she gets a very healthy round of applause. Isabell comments, “this is for you.” Lauren has to be smiling all the way back to the barn.

Continual reminder to keep the line… on the diagonal, in the shoulder-in, after the changes… always you must know what line you started on and stay on it!

Don’t sacrifice the gaits through over-management of the next movement

Next is Yvonne Losos de Muñiz on Felicia, her nine-year-old mare by Vivaldi.

Yvonne Losos de Muñiz on Felicia. © 2019 Ken Braddick/dressage-news.com

The mare is rather tense in this atmosphere… stands packed, lights, a lady with a microphone in the middle of the arena and the VIP section, eating and drinking with enthusiasm, creating the associated noises.

“So as a trainer we now look at this horse, which is completely different to Lauren’s horse and figure out the best way to train this horse. The tension is creating uneven steps behind and a ‘passagey’ trot lacking any relaxation.”

Isabell starts simply by asking for bigger circles. Then she asks Yvonne to add flexion.

“Keep flexion and add bend and keep riding over the ground. Don’t ride from front to hind legs, ride the opposite. Give small aids but enough to transfer the attention from the surrounds to the rider. Add flexion and ride the hind legs. Always keep the flexion, and use the inside leg. Shoulder in, keep the flexion, use your outside leg to control her outside leg, that it travels under the horse especially on the 10-meter circle”

Isabell quickly establishes a mantra for the trot for Yvonne and Felicia—“flexion, inside leg, flexion, inside leg, Don’t flex just the head and then use your outside leg to control her outside leg.”

This session was especially interesting to me as I also have a mare that would be much more tense than this one in this situation. I struggle to manage her when she gets so tense, so I was eager to hear any advice about the direction to take in this situation.

In the walk, the mare offers half steps out of tension and Isabell is quite clear that they can only happen from the aids, not from tension. So, when the walk is clear, she decides to touch the training of the half steps and work on that a little as the mare wants to pull downhill in the steps. She plays with uphill walk to uphill trot steps in piaffe… only two steps and then walk again, repeat, repeat until the mare listens for the walk aids and then she listens for the half step aids. That she starts to develop confidence from the use of leg aids. When this happens, it is back to trot.

The mare offers huge fancy trot. Again this is a situation I am familiar with. This trot must feel amazing… until it becomes unrideable.

Isabell has her staying in shoulder-in, with good flexion to keep her focused and then explore trotting smaller. This sounds easy but for sure, it isn’t. Also she uses many easy changes of direction, to keep the attention coming back to the rider so the mare continues to develop confidence in the aids from the leg and maintain the focus on the rider. Never straight, always in shoulder-in, then shoulder-in, then half-pass, then change rein, new flexion. Keep doing this… not in a quick way but in a continual way.

Then it is back to walk, more attention on the quality, more use of shoulder-in and then absolute pickiness into canter. Walk must come from true walk, not piaffe. The canter must be uphill and then you add jump.

Moving into pirouettes. The mare wants to slow down, Isabell wants to keep easy jump. She asks for some easy single changes again to refresh the idea of uphill forwards jump. Back to the pirouette. Felicia wants to get long through her body and pull down. This causes her to lose the jump through the pirouettes and also take over the size of the pirouette. After some less than perfect half pirouettes, Isabell changes tack and takes her onto a circle, Yvonne makes the circle smaller and Isabell has her using the outside leg to keep the jump and tempo as the canter collects. “She needs to maintain ‘light jump,’ instead of heavy, slow downhill jump. Also be very clear that the inside rein doesn’t block.”

The whole time you have the feeling that Isabell is trying to enunciate what she would be doing with her body in that moment. She is ADAMANT about the quality of the jump in the collected canter. The moment the mare goes wide behind (and slow) it is “ride forwards.” After getting the tempo quicker with the outside leg it is back to shoulder-in and inside leg and then forwards in canter.

The quality of the pirouettes and collected canter are transformed… totally transformed. To watch this change was worth the price of admission. It was brilliant work from trainer, rider and horse.

After the pirouettes it is on to the changes, and we are reminded again that Isabell can’t abide tiny over-managed changes… not that Yvonne was doing them, Isabell wouldn’t have given her the option. She would prefer a mistake from a good big canter than canter losing jump to a change.

Then back to trot and allowing her to swing in front of the rider. Isabell left with these parting words for Yvonne and her talented young mare: “Keep her connected as she develops, always hind legs to the bridle so she moves as one horse.”

The mare is swinging and loose as she finishes her session. Quite different from the horse that came into the arena. This was not an easy ride, but familiar to many of us with horses that really get hot under pressure. Personally, I am thrilled that someone was brave enough to put themselves in this situation so the rest of could learn.

Benjamin Albright on Falstaff. © 2019 Ken Braddick/dressage-news.com

Benjamin Albright starts his work on Falstaff and it is straight to improving the quality of the trot. Inside leg and Outside rein. She wants cadence, swing and more “fire.” This horse is a bit dull, the environment hasn’t sparked him up at all, (help!), but Isabell doesn’t care. He must swing forwards from the leg, the rider must stay sitting, his hands are not allowed to come up, no sharp turns as this interrupts the forwards swing.

I understand the pressure of the situation of volunteering to be “educated” in front of your peers but the feeling I have is almost that Isabell is working harder than the horse with more desire to get it done! She is relentless. ”Inside leg, outside rein,” and swing forwards with elasticity. I think poor Benjamin is overwhelmed and frozen a little. He starts the half-pass and the horse kind of directs the line himself. Not allowed. His hands must stay low, the horse must trot to the reins and then add swing in the half pass when he is going. Always the hind legs to the reins. Again the feeling is that Isabell is perhaps “riding” the movement more than Benjamin. She WILL NOT GIVE UP. Falstaff MUST go forwards, the rider needs to keep the reins down, needs to sit, get the flexion to the right, use the inside leg, no interruptions with the reins. As Isabell starts making a difference in the quality and the enthusiasm, her voice gets louder, more enthusiastic and Falstaff finally starts to trot through his body. Long lines, flexion until he is through the bridle.

The theme remains consistent through the walk work and then the canter

Isabel knows what she wants and she will not give up or accept less, no matter how much either Benjamin or Falstaff want to. However, it has to be said, the horse is really swinging by the end. I DO think they both slept really well the next day, maybe the day after, too.

Jacqueline Brooks and Westwood. © 2019 Ken Braddick/dressage-news.com

Jacqueline Brooks and Westwood is quite a new partnership. Jacquie is a favorite with just about everyone in the industry, so we are eager to watch.

Again Isabell is immediately testing the suppleness of this Grand Prix horse. She wants Jackie to ask for flexion and show his normal working trot. The riders are generally coming in showing tight, over-prepared “fancy passagey” trot, sometimes from tension in the horse, sometimes from rider tension (!), but Isabell just wants normal swinging trot in shoulder-in. She keeps asking for flexion from the inside leg to the outside rein. Clearly and repeatedly she wants legs then rein asking for flexion. It seems that perhaps Westwood isn’t overly enamored with left flexion. Isabell kinda suggests that Jacqui should perhaps use more inside leg, then more inside rein, lowering the outside rein and demand more flexion. The result: adequate left flexion.

Westwood keeps offering passagey, over-cadenced, not swinging trot. Isabell is determined that normal trot is the only acceptable one. ”Trot is trot, collected trot is collected trot and passage is passage.” Not everything can be done in passage. Isabell says it as she sees it, no worry that she may be considered a demanding German and no question of her pandering to the rider’s sensitivities. It is what it is, and that is how it is.

She also has no qualms to correct a rider’s position. She wants them straight in the saddle, no high shoulders, NO high hands and always in the most pure form of the gaits.

Right hand is on the right, left is left and the rider is in in the center.

Isabell is also adamant that the half pass comes out of the correct swinging shoulder-in. And who is to argue. Her half passes are extraordinary.

With all the riders, Isabell has also been after those who use the curb to attain flexion. Snaffle only.

She wants it all uncomplicated, the rider to sit easy. Again no micro-management. Look for a constant feel. Not dropping the contact, “Can you touch them with the leg and keep the connection. Shortening the reins CANNOT interrupt the rhythm. Keep the horse round into the canter but let them jump. Sit and keep the horse in front.”

There are no snazzy exercises, no secret weapons, it is all forwards and uphill, then allowing them to relax in the gaits and chew. The rider must sit, but like a jumping rider, not heavy.

We continue to see themes of how Isabell rides her flying changes and half passes. It is fun to watch the canter develop with Westwood as Jacqui plays with the adjustability.

In the half pass she wants the rider to sit to the inside—no argument—but use inside leg and outside rein. All the time test adjustability, collect and forwards, straight and forwards before the change and then a transition within the canter but keep the rhythm.

Again with the changes. ”Let him canter in between the changes. Let him go. Sit quiet.”

And then in the walk again absolute attention to a relaxed uphill walk, show him that you can use the leg in the walk and that he can gain confidence from the use of it. Uncomplicated walk, simple clear transition to canter.

Isabell definitely focused on the things she is known for. Pirouettes with tremendous jump, half-pass with tremendous reach, pure quality of natural gaits. No warm fuzzy moments and building up the rider. You should do it her way and she is relentless until you do.

Again we have another mini-master class on the pirouette. In the preparation for the pirouette sit still, outside rein, find collection. The canter quality says uphill with jump. Be able to use the inside leg, the outside leg and give the inside rein. Keep the jump but use your aids slowly, no hurried whirling pirouettes. When you are in the pirouette, remember to ride within the pirouette, make him rounder, keep the jump, turn the shoulder. We are starting to understand what Isabell is thinking as she rides her pirouettes. No stride is accidental, but no stride is hurried or tight.

“Make him understand the inside leg coming into the pirouette so he isn’t in a half-pass into the pirouette. She remains as focused on the way into the pirouette as during the pirouette. Jacqui does what is perhaps the best pirouette Westwood has ever done, she gets a round of applause and then Isabell exclaims: “Jaaaaa, now he comes towards a pirouette.” Those Germans have HIGH standards.

Piaffe/Passage

First you must have a normal real trot. Forwards from the leg and uphill. Then as you go into passage, leave him alone, let him relax and chew. Just sit and only use the snaffle, pat him on the neck. Westwood passages a little tight through his body and snapping tight legs. Isabell wants something more loose and believes Westwood can do it. She is making soothing noises and then wants Jackie to find again a normal trot. In the normal trot, sit independent from the reins that he just trots. When he is swinging in normal trot, independent of the reins then just softly into passage. She adds a little lateral movement, tiny half-pass, a little shoulder-in, brings the hind leg under and then into piaffe. All one rhythm and keep the occasional pat with one hand. She keeps asking Jackie to let him chew, so a slight relaxation of the rein and mental breath. Then back to normal trot with easy inside flexion.

She wants Westwood to make clear differences between normal trot then passage. When he can make normal trot, into easy passage then he can go into a beautiful in-the-place relaxed piaffe with transitions in and out for easily 9s. Jacqui had to be thrilled.

She needs to take time in the passage that he finds out how to swing. Then the transitions are easy, not hurried.

Jacqui leaves to tremendous applause. I know she would not have been offended by any of Isabell’s corrections and I can only assume she is deeply satisfied leaving. It was an absolute delight to watch an established international rider let herself be directed by Isabell. I talked with Jacqui after her ride and how impressed I was that she did everything that was asked, without question, and to the best of Westwood’s ability and Jacqui said, “If you can’t trust what Isabell says then who?” Succinctly said, Jaqueline Brooks!

Austin Webster on Abacrombie. © 2019 Ken Braddick/dressage-news.com

The truth is that I have had to think quite a bit about how to write about this combination of Austin Webster and Abacrombie.

They seemed to have a hard time truly following Isabell’s directives and Isabell got quite animated because of it. In the end, I figured that I would do exactly as I had for the other riders. Take nothing out of context and report as I saw it. It was actually a truly interesting lesson and the end result was worth the struggle.

Abacrombie is just a little tense and tight through his entire body, so it will be no surprise to anyone that the session starts with shoulder-in, with Isabell looking for fluidity. Flexion and swing, flexion and swing and—guess what?—a little more flexion and inside leg. As lovely as Abacrombie is, he isn’t really taking the contact forwards. Isabell is aware of this. “Keep the connection that you have not so much flappy and unsteady reins.”

“Let him move with fluidity, not so much passagey, longer reins, let him go. Longer reins, he is not running away, I promise you. Let him fly and move to his potential. Don’t stop him, and steady reins. More, more, more. Jaaaaaa, keep on going and don’t interrupt him and turn into the half pass, just on your seat and fluently sweep. Sit on your seat and let him go. LET HIM GO—click, click click—that he can swing. Don’t hold him, flexion, reins lower, down with your hands and fluently.”

It is getting late and by the sixth rider, with no breaks and the intensity that Isabell offers, it is the truly interested and dedicated that are still watching. Still a good number, but reduced from the initial crowd. We ALL want Austin to succeed. I swear we were all thinking (for sure I was), “If she says more sideways, Austin, she really means USE YOUR LEG, go more sideways!”

Sit and outside rein and then in front of you. Give the inside rein, let him go forwards, but slowly; ground cover, not running. Keep the hands still, really concentrate on your hands. More inside leg and let him go forwards that he can really start to canter.

Abacrombie is pretty sure that he can go up and down rather than cover ground (I am familiar with that feeling). He is sure that ground cover is not in his wheelhouse. Isabell points out that we can hear him hit the ground as he canters. She doesn’t want to hear him. As she asks Austin to keep going forwards he also gives his reins, loses the connection. The horse can’t canter through the rein then. Again, Isabell will not be deterred. She knows what she wants, and that is a canter with ground cover, and she will not give up. “Forwards to the outside rein and back into trot.” And she starts to get a little happy. “This is the minimum. You need to let him go. Sit and just let him go. Don’t keep interrupting with your reins.”

This master class is not a riding lesson. You had better have a clue how to achieve what she asks, as she isn’t going to break it down, but she will want you to get it done. And she won’t give up until you achieve her goal. She wants her horses and riders to ride from the hind legs to the bridle, no half measures. And she is right. The quality of the gaits over everything else. Swing, ground cover, forwards intent, uncomplicated transitions. Austin and Abacrombie do a ton of canter trot, trot canter transitions until they become swinging, into big uphill ground covering gaits, flowing from one to the other. No backwards reins or false tension from shortened reins. The legs stay on to give confidence.

In the schooling of the half pass, Isabell wants a long half pass with ground cover. When riders make the same mistake repeatedly you can hear a “tch” of irritation creep into her voice. Abacrombie makes three one-tempis after the half pass left three times. She is not impressed and asks (rhetorically) why Austin doesn’t do something about it after three times—”keep him flexed right after the change.” Of course, he then does only the one required change.

Pirouettes are a highlight, only refining little details. Finally a “GOOD,” although Abacrombie steals some one-tempis again after the flying change to the right.

Back to the walk again, and again the horse is not so rideable in the walk. Immediately into shoulder-in and the ability to keep the leg on until the horse takes a breath and the walk becomes uphill and uncomplicated.

Passage/piaffe

This is where we saw Isabell get both creative and very determined. The horse has an amazing piaffe/passage, but again it is overly micro-managed and lacking relaxation.

First she wants shoulder-in and then into passage. He goes into a very tight passage, which frankly most of us would be pretty ecstatic with, but Isabell wants adjustability. “Can you make it a little bigger, a little less tense, Let him swing more, let go of the reins, take the reins in one hand, keep on passaging and pat him. Keep going, sit upright, don’t lean back, put the reins in one hand. Please, ONE HAND Keep the reins in ONE HAND. He is not running away, keep it, trust him, and then into piaffe.”

Austin picks up both reins again. Abacrombie stops. Isabell demands, “Why did you take the reins? Let him trust you instead of being scared of the reins.” And back to piaffe, and Austin has to grab that rein (sorry Austin, we all feel for you but desperately want to see how he does with just the one hand). The passage is beautiful.

“Now slowly trot; yes, TROT, not passage. He needs to breathe, and now passage…slowly. And now slowly back to piaffe and now back to passage. He needs to relax. Let him chew, pat him, let him go to trot, it is a very thin line between passage and trot, but you have to feel the moment to go out and in. Steady reins and SIT ON YOUR SEAT. Don’t disturb him, don’t interrupt him the whole time with your reins. OK, lets give that one hand thing a go again and now one or two steps piaffe with one rein; yes, it is gorgeous. Now out to relaxed natural trot. Educate your hands with your reins. You can’t hold him with your reins. He has to trot alone.”

Abacrombie and Austin finish. We are all thrilled with the change in the horse, I hope Austin is, too. Isabell’s final words essentially describe how she rides.
“Everything has to happen going away from your hands. Transitions, trotting, balance, forwards. Everything without the reins.”

We all have a tiny glimpse into how she achieves such high scores, such freedom with her horses, how she can ride any type of horse. I can’t wait to start riding with more shoulder-in.

Source: Dressage News

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FEI Reports “Very High” Level of Interest, Quality of Submissions to Host 2022 Individual World Championships With 2 Weeks to Deadline

The last World Equestrian Games combining all horse sports governed by the International Equestrian Federation?

LAUSANNE, Switzerland, Feb. 13, 2018–The International Equestrian Federation (FEI) reported Wednesday “very high” level of interest and quality of submissions two weeks ahead of the deadline to bid for world championships in 2022 of the eight international horse sports that for 28 years were combined into a single World Equestrian Games.

The FEI said it “has already received some exciting expressions of interest for 2022, with more submissions expected before the 28 February deadline.”

“I am delighted to say that the level of interest and the quality of submissions to host FEI World Championships in 2022 has been very high so far, and we are confident that we will have an interesting pool of candidates to choose from when the allocations are made later this year,” FEI President Ingmar De Vos said.

The FEI gave no details of interest in any of the disciplines of dressage, driving, endurance, eventing, jumping, reining, vaulting and para dressage or from which countries. The 2022 championships will be awarded in November after a workshof interested bidders in March.

“Equestrian sport has become increasingly globalized,” he said, “but there are relatively few countries that have the capacity to host world championships in all disciplines simultaneously.

“The new bid process allows for the sustainable and cost-effective use of existing equestrian sports facilities and for the FEI to partner with national federations that may have hesitated putting forward multi-discipline bids in the past. The door is now open for these Federations to consider submitting an expression of interest for an individual world championship in the discipline of their choice.”

A bid process for individual world championships of what the FEI previously listed as eight disciplines but has begun combining dressage and para dressage into a single sport to make it seven disciplines was begun late last year when no applicants for a combined 2022 WEG were received. The WEG was instituted in 1990 as the combined world championships of all horse sports governed by the FEI and staged once every four years midway between the summer Olympics schedule. An increase in the numer of sports–reining was not included until 2006 and para dressage in 2010–and increasingly greater costs of staging the event in a calendar already full of high quality regular annual competitions took its toll. More than 4,000 FEI events are organized globally every year, including annual World Cup Finals.

The FEI president, according to Wednesday’s news release, stressed that the individual world championships or smaller combinations “does not necessarily mean the end of the FEI World Equestrian Games concept,” and bids to host all disciplines together for 2022 will be considered.

Preference in the current round of bidding is being given to multi-discipline bids with emphasis on combining dressage and para bressage. The world championships for 2022 in the Olympic disciplines of dressage, eventing and jumping and para dressage will be qualifiers for the Paris 2024 Games.

The FEI will host an interactive workshop in Lausanne at the end of March for all national federations/organizing committees that submit an expression of interest in the 2022 championships. After that, interested bidders will be invited to submit a formal bid, outlining their plans and visions.

“This interactive workshop is a key factor in ensuring that we adequately convey the structure, opportunities and minimum requirements of hosting the FEI World Championships 2022,” Ingmar De Vos said. “By working more closely with the national federations and organizing committees from the very start of the process we can ensure a unified vision and establish an achievable set of goals to work toward.”

Source: Dressage News

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Canada’s Brittany Fraser Tops Florida’s Global Dressage Festival Prize Money Rankings With Whopping $42,200 Ahead of “Baby” Break

Brittany Fraser-Beaulieu of Canada on All celebrating victory at the Adequan Global Dressage Festival CDI5*, the richest dressage event outside Europe. © 2019 Ken Braddick/dressage-news.com

WELLINGTON, Florida, Feb. 11, 2019–Brittany Fraser began a break from competition to prepare for the birth of a baby with a big pay check for the Canadian’s victory on All In at the Adequan Global Dressage Festival CDI5* that boosted the rider to the top of the prize money rankings after the third of seven weeks of international events over winter.

Victories for Brittany and the 14-year-old KWPN gelding in the Grand Prix and the Freestyle of the CDI5*, the highest level of dressage competition and the only one outside Europe, earned the rider $38,800 and raised total earnings for the circuit to $42,200, according to calculations by dressage-news.com and presented by Cunningham & Cunningham Livestock Insurance.

The 30-year-old Britanny and All In helped Canada capture team silver at the 2015 Pan American Games. and was on her nation’s team at the World Equestrian Games in Tryon last September. She expects to give birth to a boy in June and when she resumes riding will be focused on seeking a start for Canada at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

Katherine Bateson-Chandler of Wellington, runner-up in the CDI5* competitions, ranked second on $29,000, with Canada’s Jill Irving third on $21,500, Christoph Koschel of Germany fourth on $20,275 and Yvonne Losos de Muñiz of the Dominican Republic in the fifth spot on $16,550.

Americans Adrienne Lyle with $15,750, Shelly Francis on $13,100, Jessica Jo Tate on $10,700 and Laura Graves with $8,300 along with Germany’s Michael Klimke on $11,290 make up the rest of the top 10.

The next Global competition starts Feb. 20, the first of two remaining World Cup qualifiers, with a CDIO3* Nations Cup scheduled for Mar. 12-17 and the wrap up CDI4* the last week of March.

Adequan Global Dressage Festival Prize Money Earnings – Feb. 10, 2019
Presented by Cunningham & Cunningham Livestock Insurance

1. Brittany Fraser CAN $42,200
2. Katherine Bateson-Chandler USA $29,000
3. Jill Irving CAN $21,500
4. Christoph Koschel GER $20,275
5.. Yvonne Losos de Muñiz DOM $16,550
6. Adrienne Lyle USA $15,750
7. Shelly Francis USA $13,100
8. Michael Klimke GER $11,290
9. Jessica Jo Tate USA $10,700
10. Laura Graves USA $8,300
11. Joanne Vaughn GEO $5,500
12. Devon Kane USA $4,700
13. Kasey Perry-Glass USA $3,400
14. Tinne Vilhelmson Silfvén SWE $3,250
15.Tina Irwin CAN $3,105
16. Ashley Holzer USA $2,900
17 Belinda Trussell CAN $2,145
18. P.J. Rizvi USA $2,100
19. Diane Creech CAN $1,910
20. Susan Pape GBR $1,885
21. Jennifer Baumert USA $1,880
22. Jan Ebeling USA $1,655
23. Megan Lane CAN $1,625
24. Leida Collins-Strijk NED $1,510
25. Ariana Chia CAN $1,440
T-26. Codi Harrison USA $1,300
T-26James Koford USA $1,300
28. Bent Jensen USA $1,200
29. Heather Boo USA $1,175
30. Signe Kirk Kristiansen DEN $1,050
31. Meagan Davis USA $1,040
32. Alexandra Dominguez GUA $1,000

Source: Dressage News

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Judy Reynolds Is Irish Field Dressage Rider of Year 2018

Judy Reynolds and Vancouver K. File photo. © Ken Braddick/dressage-news.com

Feb. 11, 2019

Judy Reynolds is The Irish Field Dressage Rider of the Year for 2018, the sixth annual title awarded to the Olympic four-time World Equestrian Games competitor.

Judy, 37 years old, in Tryon, North Carolina last September became the first ever Irish dressage rider to qualify for the Grand Prix Freestyle at a WEG. The final was canceled because of adverse weather.

Judy and Vancouver K, her 2016 Olympic and 2018 WEG mount, a 17-year-old KWPN gelding, are ranked 35th in the world.

 

Source: Dressage News

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Sweden’s Minna Telde & Isac Win Grand Prix and Special, Märit Olofsson Nääs & Strolchi Take Freestyle at Sopot CDI3*

Minna Telde and Isac. File photo. © Ken Braddick/dressage-news.com

SOPOT, Poland, Feb. 10, 2019–Sweden’s Minna Telde on Isac won the CDI3* Grand Prix and the Special while fellow Swede Märit Olofsson Nääs on Strolchi captured the Grand Prix Freestyle.

Minna, who competed for Sweden at the 2014 World Equestrian Games and the 2015 European Championships, rode the 14-year-old Swedish Warmblood gelding to a score of 71.913 per cent in the Grand Prix.

Poland’s Katarzyna Milczarek on Dzeko placed second on 68.652 per cent with Märit and Strolchi third on 67.435 per cent.

Minna and Isac were awarded 69.894 per cent to win the Special with Katarzyna on Dzeko second on 68.511 per cent and Grmany’s Alina Röhricht on Atlantis third on 66.191 per cent.

Marit and Strolchi won the Freestyle on a score of 69.665 per cent, with Clara Espinosa also of Sweden on Gordon second with 68.155 per cent and Italy’s Silvia Rizzo on Ducati third on 67.385 per cent.

Results:

CDI3* Grand Prix

Judges-E: Marlena GRUCA RUCINSKA-POL H: Eva-Maria VINT-WARMINGTON-EST C: Clive HALSALL-GBR M: Maria COLLIANDER-FIN B: Nataliia Rubashko-BLR

CDI3* Grand Prix Special

Judges-E: Clive HALSALL-GBR H: Marlena GRUCA RUCINSKA-POL C: Maria COLLIANDER-FIN M: Nataliia Rubashko-BLR B: Malgorzata PAWLOWSKA-POL

CDI3* Grand Prix Freestyle
Judges-E: Malgorzata PAWLOWSKA-POL H: Maria COLLIANDER-FIN C: Eva-Maria VINT-WARMINGTON-EST M: Clive HALSALL-GBR B: Marlena GRUCA RUCINSKA-POL

Source: Dressage News

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